My vagina does not smell right, what do I do?

Many women worry about their vaginal scent, motivated mainly by the erroneous idea that the natural smell that their vaginas emit would be offensive to other people. Could not be farther from the truth. The natural aroma of vaginal secretions is not only offensive; it is a source of much excitement for the vast majority of people, even considered as an aphrodisiac. However, we live in a culture that insists on hiding the natural smells of our bodies, including those of our genitalia.

it is not necessary to wash the vagina,

It is not my intention to belittle the significant contribution that good hygiene makes to our sexual interactions, but I strongly criticize the idea that our genitals should smell like baby powder, fresh flowers, or pine. One thing is to smell a vulva after the person in question finishes his two hours of daily exercise in the gym, and another very different is that vulva, clean, that simply smells like a vulva.

It’s about not looking to change one smell for another. Therefore, I invite you to evaluate the validity of that impression you are having: is it a concern based on something real, or an unreal expectation? Have you noticed a significant change in your smell, or have you simply never felt comfortable with your natural scent?

The important thing here is that you can maintain good genital hygiene so that the odor you issue is natural, and not one caused by infections or a condition of your vulva. You will achieve most simply: washing your vulva external regularly with warm water and soft soap. As simple as that Internally, it is not necessary to wash the vagina, since nature takes care of its hygiene by releasing secretions.

Douching is not only not necessary but is often responsible for irritation, allergies or infections that, in turn, cause the genital odor. It happens because the vagina contains a healthy mixture of bacteria and microbes in its flora, and the vaginal shower can alter its natural pH. In fact, the regular use of douching has associated with an increased risk of ectopic pregnancies, transmission of venereal diseases, infections and cervical cancer.

Douching, as well as “female deodorants,” can mask and aggravate the symptoms of some medical conditions, such as bacterial vaginosis or a vaginal fungus. If at any time you notice a difference in the type of discharge you have, or if the vaginal odor becomes stronger or sharper, you should check with your doctor to determine if there is a condition that is causing that change and treat it accordingly. Otherwise, know, accept and celebrate your natural scent.

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